Free Webinar: Introduction to the JW Player JavaScript API

The JW Player Team is hosting a Free Webinar on the new JavaScript API introduced in the JW Player 5.3 release. Live examples and tips on how to best utilize the scripting capabilities of the new API will be discussed. Note that due to overwhelming response, we are hosting two webinar sessions to accommodate everyone. The same topics will be covered on both days. Although registration is full for our November 18th session, spots are still open for the session on Friday, November 19th @ 2:00 PM ET, so please register today!

JW Player a Winner in the 2010 Streaming Media Readers’ Choice Awards

We are honored to accept the award for Best Streaming Innovation in the 2010 Streaming Media Readers' Choice Awards. LongTail Video's JW Player won the award, with overwhelming support from our community. We'd like to extend a warm thank-you to everyone that has helped us get to this point. Without your feedback and support, our products would not be where they are today!

JW Player 5.3, HTML5, and You

Common misunderstandings about HTML5, Flash, and the JW Player

The release of JW Player 5.3 introduced some important new changes to our player, and its embedding mechanisms. Both the JW Player for Flash and the JW Player for HTML5 are now completely incorporated into JW Player 5.3. As always, we've received great feedback from our community which has helped us compile this list of common misunderstandings about the Flash Player, the HTML5 Player, and Flash/HTML5 in general. With this post, I hope to help you get started with the JW Player 5.3 for Flash and HTML5.

Ready? Let’s Get Started!

1) The 5.3 player.swf file does not contain the HTML5 Player

Introducing the JW Player for Flash and HTML5

For several years, the JW Player has been a leader in the web video world.  Until recently, this has almost entirely meant Flash video.  However, with the major browser vendors all committing to bringing video rendering capabilities directly into the browser, the landscape has begun to shift.  Additionally, the absence of Flash on certain critical platforms, such as the iOS devices, is pushing many web video publishers to search for alternatives.

Is HTML5 the Answer to All of Our Problems? 

It certainly addresses some major points:

FOMS: Funny Name, Serious Talk about HTML5, Bitrate Switching, WebM, and WebSRT

Last week, in the midst of our normal support requests and software development, we found a way to squeeze in a little extra time to attend the Open Video Conference and associated meetings here in New York. Everyone here at LongTail is a strong believer in open media formats, but it is rare to see so many people who are as committed to it as we are - assembled in one place.

Understanding Video Analytics

Online video is slowing becoming ubiquitous - used more and more by publishers to promote their products and services to their customers. So how do you measure just how ubiquitous it has become? Our Answer: Video Analytics.

It is becoming increasingly important to analyze video performance. For example, retailers want to know if their video marketing efforts increase sales. Publishers want to know which type of videos (and accompanying advertisements) have the greatest return on investment. Foundations want to know if their video bulletins are successfully increasing awareness of their mission. Analytics are both intriguing and insightful across many industries.

JW Player 5.3 Beta Integrates HTML5 Support

Given the overwhelmingly popular response to the HTML5 Beta, we have decided to incorporate the HTML5 player functionality into the 5.3 release of the player. This means you can create one block of embed code that will work across all devices that support HTML5 or Flash, including the iPhone and iPad! For browsers with both Flash and HTML5 support, the choice is yours -- simply configure the player's failover behavior.

UPDATE: The 5.3 release candidate (RC1) is now available.

UPDATE 2: The official 5.3 release is now available on our main Players page.

Transcoding Best Practices

Core Wisdom

Transcoding is something of an art form whereby one must balance dozens of requirements, formats, parameters and more. Sometimes this can seem daunting for those that just want to know a little more information or want to step into the world of digital media. What follows are a culmination of best practices developed while building Bits on the Run over the last few years. This is by no means an exhaustive list but should give a good idea of some things to watch out for or remember after reading the basic Overview of Transcoding.

Introducing the Open Video Ads Project

We are proud to present our latest product in video ad serving, Open Video Ads.  Open Video Ads (OVA) is the world’s first open source initiative to implement the IAB VAST 1.0 / 2.0 standard for video ad delivery. With it, publishers can deliver any video ad from a VAST-compliant ad server into any video player.  View the official press release here.

Today, OVA has been verified on a range of ad servers including OpenX, ADTECH, 24/7 Real Media, DoubleClick, ScanScout, Microsoft and more. And in addition to the core framework, OVA offers out-of-the-box support for the JW Player and Flowplayer.

We are proud to present our latest product in video ad serving, Open Video Ads.  Open Video Ads (OVA) is the world’s first open source initiative to implement the IAB VAST 1.0 / 2.0 standard for video ad delivery. With it, publishers can deliver any video ad from a VAST-compliant ad server into any video player.  View the official press release here.

Today, OVA has been verified on a range of ad servers including OpenX, ADTECH, 24/7 Real Media, DoubleClick, ScanScout, Microsoft and more. And in addition to the core framework, OVA offers out-of-the-box support for the JW Player and Flowplayer.

Securing Your Content

Since the Napster trials in late 1999, content producers have become increasingly aware of intellectual property issues. Even then, the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) tried to send the message that the Internet had made widespread piracy possible, and that it was leading to enormous losses in revenue for the music labels and artists.

In addition to direct losses from piracy, content producers today face an even greater challenge when it comes to controlling how their work is distributed. It's quite common for anyone who admires your video to simply repost it on their site. Generally, this isn't a big deal - it's flattering and it provides a mechanism for increasing the visibility of your work. Unfortunately, this redistribution can also lead to a poor perception of your work and it can also dramatically increase your web-hosting costs.

With that in mind, I'd like to introduce "The Golden Rule":

Anyone who can watch your video can steal your video.