Delivering HLS with Amazon CloudFront

In this blog post, we will setup Amazon Cloudfront to swiftly and reliably deliver an HLS stream around the globe. We'll use JW Player to embed these streams, so they work on both iOS and desktop browsers. This post is a follow-up to the one on Encoding HLS with Amazon Elastic transcoder. That post discussed setting up storage buckets and creating Pipelines, Presets and Jobs to encode HLS.

The Cloud-Hosted JW Player & Why it is the Easiest Way to Go Live

If the term “cloud-hosted”, or “in the cloud” is still news to you, then get ready for the next wave of web-based services and applications. Software as a service is moving to the cloud -- and slowly fading are the times where bulky downloads and installs are required to support basic business needs.

The Pain of Live Streaming on Android

Streaming video on mobile devices remains one of the most challenging and frustrating experiences for viewers and broadcasters alike. When HTTP Live Streaming (HLS) was introduced, the goal was simple: easily stream live and on-demand video content to devices with a variety of bandwidth connections. Adaptive streaming is the marquee feature of HLS, and while Adobe’s RTMP can offer similar capabilities in Flash, desktop browsers like Chrome and Firefox can play HLS streams using a player like the JW Player. HLS is enhanced further by native implementations found within Safari and iOS, which makes streaming to mobile devices even easier.

So, what’s the problem?

Jan Ozer interviews JW on Apple HLS and MPEG DASH

One of the most sought-after features of JW6 is support for Apple HTTP Live Streaming (HLS), built into the new premium player. This feature enables publishers to have a single set of video files that can be streamed to both the desktop and mobile devices - vastly simplifying life and expanding publishers’ reach to even more audiences.

Apple HLS Streaming on JW Player

In an interview with Streaming Media’s Jan Ozer, Jeroen talks about how HLS support works in the JW Player, on desktops, iOS, and Android.

How to Stream Live Video From Your iPhone to the JW Player

A few people have asked us if they can stream live video from their iPhones directly to the JW Player. If you're willing to install and configure a few applications, the answer is yes! This guide will provide step-by-step instructions on how to do it.

This tutorial is broken up into three steps:

HD Video Everywhere!

These days, HD quality video is no longer an option - it is essentially a requirement. On the other hand, there are still quite a few viewers out there that are unable to play high quality video, due to connection or device constraints. A simple way to fix this is by offering an HD toggle in your player. Viewers that want the full experience select the high quality option, while viewers that don't have the capabilities (or interest) select the low quality option.

What is Video Streaming?

With all of the buzz around HTML5 and the iPad, there's been a lot of talk about the technologies underlying digital video. Besides the inevitable codecs (H264 & VP8), experts are discussing video delivery mechanisms, using indecipherable acronyms like RTMP, CDN and HLS. This blog post will give an overview of the various video streaming methods in plain English and bring the all-round developer and publisher up to date.

In a nutshell, there are three widely used ways to stream a video: Progressive Download, RTMP/RTSP Streaming, and Adaptive HTTP Streaming. We'll look at the three in detail here, describing their pros, cons, and various technologies that support each.

W3C WebTV: Adaptive Streaming & Content Protection

Last week, the W3C held its Second Web & TV Workshop in Berlin. The workshop focused on the convergence of web technology and broadcasting. In other words, how will web and television work together to eventually merge?

Along with sessions on second-screen scenarios and accessibility, the workshops covered adaptive streaming and content protection. Both sessions were very compelling considering that streaming and protection are two important limitations of today's HTML5 video support.

Adaptive Streaming: DASH