The Pain of Live Streaming on Android

Streaming video on mobile devices remains one of the most challenging and frustrating experiences for viewers and broadcasters alike. When HTTP Live Streaming (HLS) was introduced, the goal was simple: easily stream live and on-demand video content to devices with a variety of bandwidth connections. Adaptive streaming is the marquee feature of HLS, and while Adobe’s RTMP can offer similar capabilities in Flash, desktop browsers like Chrome and Firefox can play HLS streams using a player like the JW Player. HLS is enhanced further by native implementations found within Safari and iOS, which makes streaming to mobile devices even easier.

So, what’s the problem?

Jan Ozer interviews JW on Apple HLS and MPEG DASH

One of the most sought-after features of JW6 is support for Apple HTTP Live Streaming (HLS), built into the new premium player. This feature enables publishers to have a single set of video files that can be streamed to both the desktop and mobile devices - vastly simplifying life and expanding publishers’ reach to even more audiences.

Apple HLS Streaming on JW Player

In an interview with Streaming Media’s Jan Ozer, Jeroen talks about how HLS support works in the JW Player, on desktops, iOS, and Android.

Introducing Our Newest Online Video Player Update – JW Player 6

Today, we are proud to announce the public release of JW Player 6! JW6 is JW Player’s biggest update yet, containing tons of new or enhanced functionality. This blog post highlights the most important ones, including a redesigned interface, move to HTML5 first and support for Apple's HTTP Live Streaming in Flash.

The State of HTML5 Video Report – Market Share Updates, Text Tracks, MediaSource API and More…

This week we released another quarterly update to our online resource, The State of HTML5 Video Report. Since its launch in January, our HTML5 report has been read over 200,000 times, and is actively discussed on social media and the blogosphere. We eagerly await your feedback on this latest version!

In Q3 2012, there have been some interesting trends in market share both on the browser and mobile sides. We tested HTML5 support in Android 4.1 (Jelly Bean) and found it encouraging on most fronts. In terms of what to look for on the horizon, we are very excited about upcoming text track support and the new MediaSource API for HTML5 adaptive streaming.

What’s new in HTML5: The Track Element

One of the more exciting developments in HTML5 video is the inclusion of the track element in the newest versions of the desktop browsers. In addition to bringing captioning and subtitle support to HTML5 video, the invisible track element allows publishers to attach a rich array of textual metadata to their videos. In this blog post, we'll look at the different types of tracks that can be used in conjunction with the <video> tag.

Using the Browsers’ New HTML5 Fullscreen Capabilities

One of the killer features for HTML5 video is native browser fullscreen support. Without it, a viewer watching video through HTML5 is limited to seeing the video within the browser window, which is clearly not an immersive experience.

HTML5 Takes the Lead on Android Devices

Even before Adobe's announcement back in November that it would cease supporting Flash on Android devices, it was becoming clear to us at LongTail Video that the JW Player would need to shift its focus on Android devices towards HTML5 mode. We took the first step with the release of the 5.9 player, which now embeds itself in HTML5 mode on all Android devices by default, since our testing has shown that Android is fully capable of playing HTML5 video.