An Encouraging Development in the HEVC Patent Mess

Perspectives on the digital video world from JW Player’s SVP of Technology

Earlier this month, HEVC Advance announced changes to their royalty fees for commercial use of the HEVC video compression standard. In short, these changes will make it essentially free to distribute video content on the Internet using the HEVC codec. Previously the content royalty rate was a complex matrix of rates by content type (subscription, title-by-title, etc), but it boiled down to potentially millions of dollars per year.

AV1: The Long Road Ahead

Perspectives on the digital video world from JW Player’s SVP of Product Strategy

Last month, Apple became a founding member of the Alliance for Open Media (AOM), the project that manages development of the emerging AV1 video codec, "a next-generation video format that is . . . interoperable and open,” according to the AOM website

The story originated simply from the word "Apple" suddenly appearing on the AOM website, yet within the video tech community it was seen as a seismic shift in the video tech industry.

Embedding Vertical Videos? We Got You.

Bring 1:1 videos from Facebook to your owned & operated site

When you’re a video publisher, going viral on Facebook is like hitting the jackpot. Videos with a huge bank of comments, likes, and shares deserve a spot on your website.

Problem is: Facebook videos have a vertical, 1:1 aspect ratio, and your page might only support 16x9. Thinking you’ll have to drop that awesome video because it didn’t fit the specs? Never fear. JW Player supports the vertical video format, allowing you to easily export your videos from Facebook into your owned and operated (O&O) site.

How JW Player does Video Player Testing with QA Automation Tools

The major challenge with automated integration testing for a web player via browser automation tools is that these tools better serve the purposes of web applications such as e-commerce sites, single page applications, and social networks. How do you take a product like JW Player which is embedded on over 2 million websites where publishers are always coming up with unique ways to use the player, and build an automated testing framework that will ensure the quality of that player? I would like to walk through how we’ve taken on that challenge.

Free Webinar: The State of HTML 5 Video

On Wednesday 16 April at 2pm EST, we hosted a free webinar on the State of HTML5 Video. Jeroen Wijering was joined by Sam Dutton of Google Chrome and Mark Robertson of ReelSEO to provide insights, present demos and answer your questions on HTML5 video.

Encoding HLS with Amazon Elastic Transcoder

HLS is a powerful streaming protocol that Apple introduced in order to allow for live streaming on iOS devices. JW Player introduced HLS support in Flash too.

If you are looking to encode only a couple of videos, you could consider converting all videos manually, but if you have a larger library, it is important to replace any manual steps with a good encoding pipeline. Amazon’s Elastic transcoder has all the important components you need to create a transcoding pipeline using Amazon’s API’s.

Building Tooltip Thumbnails with Encoding.com

A great new feature in JW Player is the popup of quick preview images when mousing over the timeSlider. This allows viewers to seek to a particular position, or to quickly scan the contents of a video. We call these previews Tooltip Thumbnails. Start this video and rollover the controlbar for a live example:

Encoding WebM Videos

WebM is coming up on its second anniversary. Released by Google as a royalty-free alternative to MP4, the video format has slowly gained traction on the web. MP4 still rules by a wide margin, but WebM has dethroned Ogg as the other leading format for HTML5 video.

This post describes two tools for encoding WebM videos: a desktop client and a cloud service. Both are free, easy to set-up and painless to understand. Which one you choose depends upon your personal preference - or the restrictions your company's IT department imposes.

HD Video Everywhere!

These days, HD quality video is no longer an option - it is essentially a requirement. On the other hand, there are still quite a few viewers out there that are unable to play high quality video, due to connection or device constraints. A simple way to fix this is by offering an HD toggle in your player. Viewers that want the full experience select the high quality option, while viewers that don't have the capabilities (or interest) select the low quality option.